Open research series

In case you missed the open research series organised by the Research Support team in January, you can catch the recordings from the events at the links below:

  1. Open access: It’s real and it’s happening now
  2. Open access: It’s legal and it’s good to be involved!
  3. The path to data sharing: How open can I go?

Each session focused on different area of open access and was delivered by a variety of speakers.

Open access: It’s real and it’s happening now includes a talk from Professor Martin Eve, co-founder and CEO of the Open Library of Humanities, who speaks about where open access is coming from and where it can be going. This is followed by a discussion about researcher experiences of open access, featuring research staff from UWE Bristol.

Open access: It’s legal and it’s good to be involved! was delivered by several members of the library team. We give an overview of open access, a behind the scenes look at the Research Repository, an overview of creative commons licenses, and more information about the green and gold routes of publishing, the dangers of ResearchGate, funder requirements, and ORCiD.

The path to data sharing: How open can I go? features a talk from Professor Felix Ritchie about open data and the 5 safes framework. The session also covers research governance, data management plans, and the support available for data management at UWE Bristol.


Image used – “Open Sign” by Chip Griffin is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Spotlight: Bright bricks, dark play

Lego chapter

To head off any questions in advance – no, the subject of today’s spotlight is not a LEGO model (no. 5978, Sphinx Secret Surprise in case you were interested, released in 1998.)

Bright bricks, dark play: On the impossibility of studying LEGO is a book chapter by Seth Giddings, looking at how LEGO is played with and asking ‘if LEGO play does not follow the instructions, how can it be studied?’ Seth asked for memories of playing with LEGO in childhood and these memories are discussed in the chapter.

If you find this interesting, Seth has uploaded another book chapter, this time about the video game LEGO Star Wars, and the success (or not!) of playing it.

Termly statistics March-May 2017

“Pie Chart” by Mike Licht is licensed under CC BY 2.0It’s time for the most recent batch of termly statistics about the Research Repository (plus bonus pie chart!)

As of May 2017 there are currently 23,675 live records on the Research Repository. 690 of these were published in 2017.

The UK remains the country downloading the most from the Research Repository, followed by USA and China.

We have had to exclude visitor numbers from the stats as the software we use has decided it hates us. We are investigating alternatives and this should be back for the next report.

UWE Bristol members of staff can access the full statistics document on SharePoint. Please contact the team for any more information or with any suggestions for what you would like to see in future statistics reports.


Image used – “Pie Chart” by Mike Licht is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Spotlight: SAM App

SAM app

Today’s spotlight is SAM, the Self-help Anxiety Management app created at UWE Bristol. The app was developed as a tool to help students (and anyone around the world who suffers with anxiety) to manage and better support their anxiety. The app features different tools and activities to help users monitor their anxiety levels and reduce anxiety during an attack.

The Research Repository includes a project report and links to a video summarising the project. There is also a further project report available, which goes into further detail.

The app is available for free for Android and Apple devices, and was declared one of Healthline’s Best Anxiety App winners for 2016.

Using copyright material in your thesis

As a postgraduate researcher writing your thesis you may need or want to use third-party material for which you do not own the copyright. This can become a problem when you upload your thesis to the Research Repository – without permission to use the material, we will not be able to make your thesis visible and it can result in your award being delayed.

The Library Research Support team have written a guide to using copyright material in your thesis, covering different types of copyright material, what you need to do to get permission, what the alternatives are, and what your options are if permission is denied. View and download it on the Research Repository help pages.

And don’t forget – you can always contact us with questions.


Image: “Copyright help 5¢… the scholar is [IN]. #ala2013” by sylvar is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Spotlight: La Voisin

New La Voisin

The spotlight today is an artist’s book, La Voisin by Sarah Bodman.

“But that doesn’t look like a book!” I hear you exclaim. Artist’s books come in all shapes and sizes. Some closely resemble traditional books, others are more abstract or even electronic. All are pieces of art usually produced in small print runs or as one-of-a-kind pieces.

La Voisin is “[t]he imaginary diary of Catherine Monvoisin; provider of potions, solutions and services to the court of Louis XIV.” It was produced in a limited edition of only three pieces, presented in a box including a bottle, a dried red rose, prints, and diary entries. The Research Repository record includes a photo of the book as well as further information about the exhibition it was presented at.

UWE Bristol holds several artist’s books in its library collection at Bower Ashton campus, including those produced by UWE Bristol researchers. More information about artist’s book can be found at the Book Arts website.