Open Access Week: Wrap-up

This is our final post for Open Access Week 2017, and we’re using it as a bit of a wrap-up to go over our activities this week.

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Unfortunately we did not get cake. We will have to address this next year!

On Monday we published our new Open Access Benefits poster, which highlights all the benefits that publishing your work open access brings to the author, journal, and readers.

On Tuesday we recounted the story of one UWE Bristol academic who generated huge buzz around her project and reached social work practitioners by publishing her article open access.

On Wednesday we showed you what the most downloaded works from the Research Repository were for each faculty – all of which could not be accessed by so many readers if they were only hidden behind paywalls.

And yesterday we showed you a really interesting opinion piece from an Early Career Researcher about why they believed that open research was so important.

We’ve also been busy on Twitter, using #OAWeek (or #OAWeek17 or #OAWeek2017 on Monday) and #openaccess to talk about open access topics.

We’ll leave you with a comment from Professor Martin Eve, which originally concluded the first event in our Open Research Series.

You don’t know your audience sometimes. I really get quite cross when people tell me “there’s no audience for my work” or “everyone who needs to know about this gets to know about it because I’ve published it in this top journal.” I get letters, emails from people, saying “I’ve just read your article on Theoretical Aspects of David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas and it was really interesting to me, I just had a university education.” Out of the blue someone wrote to me “I don’t have access to these other journals but I read this because it was openly available, I thought it was really great. I’ve had a lot to drink, its 2 AM, thanks a lot.” [Laughter] I mean, there’s a humorous side to it that makes me smile whenever I get them, but on the other hand…especially in my field I’m writing about human culture and literatures – what’s the point of doing that if the people who read literature can’t read it? We’re just talking to ourselves the whole time.

Happy Open Access Week everyone – now let’s start thinking about #OAWeek2018!


Image: “Open Access Week 2013” by SLUB Dresden is licensed under CC BY 2.0

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Open Access Week: Faculty number 1s

As part of Open Access Week we took a look at the most downloaded items of all time (aka March 2010 when the Research Repository was established to October 2017) for the four faculties at UWE Bristol – Arts, Creative Industries and Education (ACE). Business and Law (FBL), Environment and Technology (FET), and Health and Applied Sciences (HAS). All figures are correct as of 23 October 2017.

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ACE –  The sociology of education is a book section. It is otherwise only available to read by purchasing the book, or by borrowing from a library with a copy. It is the second most downloaded item on the Research Repository, and has been accessed by readers from the UK, USA, Germany, Zambia, and India (among others.)

FBL – The ‘work group’: Redressing the balance in Bion’s Experiences in Groups is a journal article published in the journal Human Relations. The article is otherwise only available to read if the reader’s institution is subscribed to the journal.

FET – A health map for the local human habitat is a journal article published in The Journal for the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, and has been referenced in two policy documents.

HAS – Using thematic analysis in psychology is without question the ‘big daddy’ of the Research Repository, having been downloaded almost twice as many times as the other nineteen items in the all time top twenty combined.* It also has 14,700 citations in Scopus and is in the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric.

By being made available through green open access on the Research Repository, all of these researchers have allowed people from across the globe to access and use their research without the need for an institutional affiliation or prohibitively expensive subscriptions.


*The other nineteen items in the top twenty have been downloaded 271,538 times combined as of 23 October 2017.

Open Access Week: Benefits poster

What are the benefits of open access?

When it comes to deciding where to publish your research outputs, one of the questions you will need to ask yourself is “Do I want to publish my research in an open access journal, or in a traditional subscription journal?” Although you might have to pay a greater initial up-front cost, publishing your article in an open access journal has many benefits. These benefits are highlighted in the poster below – click on the poster to view it at a larger size!

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Open Access Week begins on Monday

Autumn is truly here – the days are getting shorter, the air is getting crisper, leaves are falling from the trees and we’re all thinking about certain round, orange items that have their heyday in October…

Nope, not pumpkins – the open access logo!

Happy OA Week

23-29 October is Open Access Week and to celebrate we’ll have a blog post going up each day Monday-Friday next week. We’ll also be tweeting from the Library so be sure to follow @UWELibrary on Twitter.

Check back on Monday for our first post.

 

Rewind: Open Access Week 2016 – Glossary (or, What are all these abbreviations?)

Glossary - OriginalToday’s rewind is the final poster originally created for Open Access Week 2016, but don’t let that make you think it isn’t still relevant. This poster is a glossary of some of the abbreviations and jargon used by the Library Research team every day. What does APC stand for? What is the definition of a ‘research output’? Click on the poster to view it at full size and with links to further information.

There is also a little ‘decipher the code’ quiz in the bottom right corner of the poster to test yourself once you have read it.

Rewind: Open Access Week 2016 – Altmetrics in detail

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Today’s rewind is an infographic from Open Access Week 2016, showing what else you can discover from altmetrics besides the donut score – including more detailed information about what people are saying about your work. To see the full infographic, click on the preview above.

For information about altmetrics and what they mean for your research please feel free to contact us.