ACE Creative Skills Week

I (Charley) am going to be taking part in the Creative Skills Week for ACE staff taking place over the next few days.

  • On Friday 22nd June at 10:30 at Bower Ashton campus I will be doing a short presentation session billed as ‘Meet your research support librarian’. this will be a chance to get an overview of the ways in which the Research Support team can support researchers and PGRs, and will feature (fingers crossed for technology working) our new team animated video!
  • On Monday 25th June I will be at Bower Ashton campus again, available for drop-in questions and chats. Come along with any specific questions about how we can help you with your research.

Come along and find out more about the team!

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Unpaywall – finding research papers to read for free

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Unpaywall is a free browser extension for Firefox and Chrome, as well as a database of open access articles. When you come up against an article that is behind a paywall, Unpaywall searches its database for a free to read version for you, and produces a button on the right side of your screen, which takes you to the free version.

Unpaywall searches journals and repositories, so it is completely legal. It does not harvest any sources where the legality of uploads could be questionable (e.g. ResearchGate.) True open access aficionados can even turn on ‘OA Nerd Mode’ which colour codes the button to show whether the free version is gold, green, or bronze open access!

Add the browser extension to start locating free articles.

 

Options for open access publishing

Confused about how to make your work available open access? We have created a new guide showing the different routes available to UWE Bristol researchers, and it is available as an easy-to-follow poster (click on the poster to see it larger):

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The poster outlines the routes to open access via the gold and green routes.

  • The gold route to open access is achieved through paying an article processing charge or publishing in a journal where we have an offset agreement – this means your work will be immediately publicly visible.
  • The green route to open access is achieved by freely uploading your work to the UWE Research Repository, where it can (usually) become publicly visible after an embargo period.

Both are routes to open access, and all items should be added to the Research Repository regardless of whether they are already published via gold open access.

For more information, read the poster, contact us, and check out the Library webpages.

Q: Are you sure you’re allowed to do this?

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Q: I’ve been asked for the full text of my paper and I don’t know if I want to send it. Are you actually allowed to put the full text on the Research Repository? Doesn’t that go against the publisher’s terms?

A: The repository team checks the archiving requirements of every item before it is made publicly visible on the Research Repository. We have a few different tools for this depending on the item type.

For journals we use the Sherpa-Romeo database which contains the publisher archiving policies of many journals. This shows what version we are allowed to archive, what embargo we need to apply, and if a set statement is required. We check all of these against what you have uploaded and will get back in contact if we have any queries, otherwise we apply the embargo and statement as required by the publisher.

For book chapters we have a document, which librarians from many institutions have contributed to, which contains details and links to publisher policies. We also check that the version you have provided is the one we are allowed to archive.

If the policy is unclear, or the journal is not in the Sherpa-Romeo database, we look for the policy on the publisher’s website. We will also email the publisher if there is no policy or if we require further information.

Q: Why isn’t the full text showing?

Quickfire questions header

Q: I’m sure I uploaded the author’s accepted version of my paper when I deposited it, but the full text isn’t showing – did I not upload it properly?

A: You may not see the full text of your paper immediately if you upload it to the Research Repository. Many journals allow us to archive the author’s accepted version but only after observing an embargo period (the green open access route.) These typically range from 6-24 months depending on the journal and subject. The embargo is typically applied from the date that the article version of record is published online.

Once the version of record is published online, the repository team will apply any required embargo. This will automatically expire at the appropriate time, at which point the full text will be publicly visible and downloadable.

Other reasons that your full text may not be visible: we aren’t permitted to archive the version you uploaded, we are awaiting information from the publisher, or there was no full text uploaded with the record. If you are unsure, contact the repository team and we can check for you.

Q: What version should I upload?

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Q: What version of the full text should I upload to the Research Repository?

A: The version we are most frequently permitted to archive is the author’s accepted manuscript (also called AAM, accepted version, or post-print).

Dateofacceptance

This is the version of the text that is accepted by the publisher. For journal articles this is after the article has gone through peer review, and any changes resulting from peer review have been incorporated, but before any publisher formatting is added. This means we cannot use proofs, as they feature publisher formatting (of which the publisher holds the copyright.)

This is the version required to comply with the HEFCE policy, and is the version that most journals allow us to archive anyway. For book chapters this is also the version we are most likely to be able to archive, so if in doubt – upload the accepted version. The repository team will check the publisher requirements and get in touch if a different version is required.

Open Access Week: Wrap-up

This is our final post for Open Access Week 2017, and we’re using it as a bit of a wrap-up to go over our activities this week.

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Unfortunately we did not get cake. We will have to address this next year!

On Monday we published our new Open Access Benefits poster, which highlights all the benefits that publishing your work open access brings to the author, journal, and readers.

On Tuesday we recounted the story of one UWE Bristol academic who generated huge buzz around her project and reached social work practitioners by publishing her article open access.

On Wednesday we showed you what the most downloaded works from the Research Repository were for each faculty – all of which could not be accessed by so many readers if they were only hidden behind paywalls.

And yesterday we showed you a really interesting opinion piece from an Early Career Researcher about why they believed that open research was so important.

We’ve also been busy on Twitter, using #OAWeek (or #OAWeek17 or #OAWeek2017 on Monday) and #openaccess to talk about open access topics.

We’ll leave you with a comment from Professor Martin Eve, which originally concluded the first event in our Open Research Series.

You don’t know your audience sometimes. I really get quite cross when people tell me “there’s no audience for my work” or “everyone who needs to know about this gets to know about it because I’ve published it in this top journal.” I get letters, emails from people, saying “I’ve just read your article on Theoretical Aspects of David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas and it was really interesting to me, I just had a university education.” Out of the blue someone wrote to me “I don’t have access to these other journals but I read this because it was openly available, I thought it was really great. I’ve had a lot to drink, its 2 AM, thanks a lot.” [Laughter] I mean, there’s a humorous side to it that makes me smile whenever I get them, but on the other hand…especially in my field I’m writing about human culture and literatures – what’s the point of doing that if the people who read literature can’t read it? We’re just talking to ourselves the whole time.

Happy Open Access Week everyone – now let’s start thinking about #OAWeek2018!


Image: “Open Access Week 2013” by SLUB Dresden is licensed under CC BY 2.0