New banner!

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Presenting our new team banner! You may remember that Charley got roped into posing for the banner photograph – here is the final result.

What you see in the picture is actually the mini version of the banner – we have both a large version and this conveniently travel sized tabletop version. Charley will be making use of the tabletop banner during her monthly visits to Bower Ashton campus (re-starting tomorrow, the 27th of September) and we will unfurl the larger banner at our drop-in sessions at Frenchay campus.

So now you know what to look for, if you see the banner come over and say hello!

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Librarians on tour – Wells Cathedral Library – books in chains!

On tour

Last month, Jane was fortunate enough to visit the chained library at Wells Cathedral.

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Built in 1450, this working library has been in use for over 550 years. Wells is only 1 of 4 chained libraries remaining in the country.

An iron gate separates the reading room from the library where some books are still chained to the shelves. The move to chaining books to the shelves in the 1600s was seen as a way of increasing access! Previously books were stored in chained boxes and readers had to ask for each box to be unlocked by the custodians. By chaining the books to the shelves, readers only had to request to be let in through the locked gate. They could then browse the shelves and then read the books, at chains length, on the shelves below.

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(Note from Charley: there is surely an analogy to be drawn here between chaining books to shelves and open access, but we won’t get into that…)

Librarians on Tour – Erasmus week in Dublin

On tour

In mid-June I (Jane) was lucky enough to attend the Erasmus library staff mobility week in Dublin. A group of academic librarians from across Europe, got together to talk about various library activities in their home institutions.

Each attendee was required to give a short presentation on their chosen theme. This resulted in some great discussions. My presentation, Customer service and the Future Library at the University of the West of England is available on the Research Repository.

A real bonus of the week was getting to visit some fantastic libraries in and around Dublin as each theme was hosted at a different institution. Here are some pictures from the visit where you can see a wide range of libraries!

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Librarians on Tour – Exeter Central Library

On tour

In mid-May, I (Anna) was lucky enough to re-visit my hometown and child-hood library, Exeter Central Library. This time though, I wasn’t running up the circle-slope outside the library, hunting through the children’s books, or playing on the rocking horse. Instead, I was attending an Introduction to Grant seeking course run by SWRLS and led by Bill Bruty (a professional fundraiser).

I got to see Exeter Central Library from a very different perspective – enjoying the very open, window-filled conference room; getting a chance to read the displays, and letters home, from Indians who fought in the world wars; enjoying the way that bay ends had recognisable photos of the local area; and taking a quick peek at the FabLab (where members of the public can design their own products, including the use of a 3D printer).

#UWEGold

The results of the 2018 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) are in and UWE achieved gold status. To celebrate, the university threw a reception for staff featuring cake, drinks, and an ice-cream van. The Research Support team spotted the van out of the office window and the next thing anyone knew we were all enjoying free ice-creams!

You can see some pictures of the event below.

Librarians on Tour – Bristol Zoo AULIC Visit

On tour

On Wednesday 23rd May I (Lisa) was lucky enough to spend the morning at Bristol Zoo to visit the library there, and find out more about what they do. The morning began with an introduction from Simon Garrett (Head of Learning), who talked about the three main areas that they cover: 1) Conservation, 2) Field work, and 3) Changing human behaviours.  As well as providing entertainment for the public, zoos are able to target people of all ages and challenge the decisions that they are making in their everyday lives, which could have a big impact on the environment. This year they are working on a behaviour change campaign that encourages consumers to purchase sustainable palm oil.

We were then split into two groups, and my group was taken on a tour of the Education Centre, which included a lecture room, lab, computer room, common room, and library. Siobhan (the only Bristol Zoo librarian!) delivered an interesting talk about the library, and the resources that they have. Here are some facts about the library:

  • The library can be used by University students, researchers, zoo staff, volunteers, and the public upon request.
  • It is relatively small, with 4500 books, 2500 journal issues, and 2 e-resource subscriptions!
  • A large collection of the books were donated from the BBC Wildlife unit. Other books were obtained from departments around the zoo.
  • There is a unique cataloguing system, which was developed many years ago by volunteers, and has never been changed (e.g. Ec-H-W-5 would indicate a book in the ecology section, under the subheadings habitat – woodland, which was the fifth book to be added to this group).

We were then free to browse the books, and admire the interesting view out the window of the capybaras!

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I’m ready for my close-up…

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I (Charley) recently had the luck to be involved in the photoshoot for our new Research Support Team banner. Our old banner is out of date, so we need a new one to take for our regular visits to other campuses, as well as to other events or out ‘on tour’ around Frenchay campus.

I thought that I would be helping guide the photographer about what the models in the photo needed to do, and what we needed the photo to portray. Instead I found myself as one of the models! My fellow model and I gestured at a laptop, waved pens around, and made interested looking faces while trying to think of things to chat about. It was all a bit odd – I don’t know how the professionals do it.

All this means that we will soon be able to unveil our new banner, and you will then be able to spot me sitting under a picture of my own face, ready to answer any queries about open access or the repositories. Stay tuned for more information!


 

Photo found via Pexels