Meet the team: Library Information Administrator (Repositories)

The blog has been up and running for around eight months now and it’s about time we finally introduced the team behind it. Each person in the Library Research Support team will be writing an introduction in our ‘Meet the team’ series of blog posts. Today we feature…

LisaHello, I’m Lisa! I’m the Repository Administrator for the Research Team, and I’ve been in this role for just under a year now.

My main responsibility is to check every item that comes into the Research Repository review area, before making them live. This involves checking that the metadata has been filled in correctly, and checking publisher’s archiving policies before making text live. I also check PhD theses that are uploaded to the repository, to ensure that there are no outstanding copyright issues.

Alongside Charley Vaughton (the Repository Manager), I monitor the eprints inbox and answer the Repository phone. Typical inquiries that I respond to include item amendment requests, thesis copyright queries, and questions about items not showing on staff profiles.

I am responsible for writing the termly statistics reports, which provide an insight into changes that have taken place within the Research Repository each term; for example, what are the top ten countries downloading material from the Repository?

Outside of work I like to keep fit by going to the gym, playing badminton, or going for a long walk with my partner.

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Meet the team: Research Support Librarian (Repositories)

The blog has been up and running for around eight months now and it’s about time we finally introduced the team behind it. Each person in the Library Research Support team will be writing an introduction in our ‘Meet the team’ series of blog posts and first up we have…

Staff profile picI’m Charley Vaughton, the Research Support Librarian (Repositories) to give me my full title.

I have various responsibilities covering managing the Research Repository, outreach/advocacy, teaching and training, reporting, and social media. I run the blog – writing posts (or recruiting other members of the team to write them!) and creating graphics and posters to use on the blog and in other places. I’m also the research tweeter on the Library Twitter account.

I run one-to-one training sessions for researchers, going over how to use the Research Repository and how to comply with the HEFCE policy for REF 2021. I teach a ‘copyright and your thesis’ session for PhD students, and write accompanying guides for the repository webpages. I write monthly reports assessing compliance rates with the HEFCE policy, manage the Library Information Administrator (Research Repository), and answer researcher queries about open access and the repositories

DeskI work at Bower Ashton campus every month, please come over and say hi if you see me – I’m there to answer any questions and give training wherever possible!

I also like reading (there’s usually a book on my desk), collecting pretty stationary that I’m then reluctant to use, and playing video games (badly.)

Contact me about the HEFCE policy, the Research and Data repositories, open access, or if you would like to arrange a training session.

Blog tools

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There are a few different resources we use when finding and producing content for the blog, and this post looks at the three that we make the most use of.

1. CC Search and CC Search Beta

We like using images on this blog. We also like making sure we comply with copyright law, which isn’t always easy when you want to use images found on the internet (just because it does not have a copyright notice on it, that does not mean copyright does not exist.)

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Research Support annual report

Research Way, Tamar Science Park

The annual report for the Research Repository has had an overhaul this year.

The new report gives an overview of some of the activities that the team has been involved in over the last year, usage statistics for the Research Repository, and aims for the team going forward.

The report has been stripped down and rebuilt into a more streamlined and visually friendly format, and is available to view on the Research Repository.


Image: “Research Way” by Graham Richardson is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Open research series

In case you missed the open research series organised by the Research Support team in January, you can catch the recordings from the events at the links below:

  1. Open access: It’s real and it’s happening now
  2. Open access: It’s legal and it’s good to be involved!
  3. The path to data sharing: How open can I go?

Each session focused on different area of open access and was delivered by a variety of speakers.

Open access: It’s real and it’s happening now includes a talk from Professor Martin Eve, co-founder and CEO of the Open Library of Humanities, who speaks about where open access is coming from and where it can be going. This is followed by a discussion about researcher experiences of open access, featuring research staff from UWE Bristol.

Open access: It’s legal and it’s good to be involved! was delivered by several members of the library team. We give an overview of open access, a behind the scenes look at the Research Repository, an overview of creative commons licenses, and more information about the green and gold routes of publishing, the dangers of ResearchGate, funder requirements, and ORCiD.

The path to data sharing: How open can I go? features a talk from Professor Felix Ritchie about open data and the 5 safes framework. The session also covers research governance, data management plans, and the support available for data management at UWE Bristol.


Image used – “Open Sign” by Chip Griffin is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Tour de UWE

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We had a glorious day for the Tour de UWE 2017 – the event is an annual opportunity for library staff to take part in either a cycle ride or a walk, and aims to raise money for the charity Life Cycle.

The Research team went off on the walk, which took us through Stoke Park on the sculpture trail. The whole troupe of librarians on the walk managed to find the hedgehogs, snake, and (eventually) the owls – after enlisting the aid of some helpful children who were very keen to show us where they were! (Librarians know the value of asking an expert to help you find the things you need.)

As half the walkers went off to Boston Tea Party for lunch, the hardy picnickers carried on and found the rabbit and mouse sculptures. Unfortunately the fox remains hidden in the woods, undiscovered on this walk (maybe next year?)