Altmetric top 100

Just before Christmas, Altmetric published their top 100 list of articles from 2017 – the list is organised by Altmetric score, and can be filtered by journal, subject, and institution. It is a look at what works received attention in 2017 from social media, policy documents, the news, and blogs.

The top ten includes a lot of health based work, dinosaurs, and gender stereotypes. Take a look at the full list for more information. You can also go back and view the lists for previous years.

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An exercise in outreach – explaining a mouse penis to the TSA

Be honest – how many of you clicked onto this post just because of the title? (There’s a whole post in that just in itself – how articles with ‘popular’ or eyecatching headlines get more impressions from social media and therefore higher altmetric scores…but that’s a topic for another day.)

This article from The Atlantic, That Time the TSA Found a Scientist’s 3-D-Printed Mouse Penis is an entertaining read just to see the sheer variety of weird and wonderful things that scientists carry on to planes in the name of research. Ancient bones? Check. Bat detecting equipment? Check. Live frogs? Check. But it also raises an interesting point around scientific outreach.

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Rewind: Open Access Week 2016 – Altmetrics in detail

What more block 1

Today’s rewind is an infographic from Open Access Week 2016, showing what else you can discover from altmetrics besides the donut score – including more detailed information about what people are saying about your work. To see the full infographic, click on the preview above.

For information about altmetrics and what they mean for your research please feel free to contact us.

Rewind: Open Access Week 2016 – Mmmm, donuts

Donut - A4, OriginalToday’s rewind is the third poster originally created for Open Access Week 2016. Altmetrics donuts now appear on journal article on the UWE Bristol Research Repository, and this poster explains what they are and what they mean. Click on the poster to see it at full size.

The donut shows the attention that an article has received from ‘alternative’ sources including news outlets, blogs, policy documents, and Twitter. It can be used in conjunction with ‘traditional’ metrics (like citation rates) to give an idea of research impact.