Q: Why isn’t the full text showing?

Quickfire questions header

Q: I’m sure I uploaded the author’s accepted version of my paper when I deposited it, but the full text isn’t showing – did I not upload it properly?

A: You may not see the full text of your paper immediately if you upload it to the Research Repository. Many journals allow us to archive the author’s accepted version but only after observing an embargo period (the green open access route.) These typically range from 6-24 months depending on the journal and subject. The embargo is typically applied from the date that the article version of record is published online.

Once the version of record is published online, the repository team will apply any required embargo. This will automatically expire at the appropriate time, at which point the full text will be publicly visible and downloadable.

Other reasons that your full text may not be visible: we aren’t permitted to archive the version you uploaded, we are awaiting information from the publisher, or there was no full text uploaded with the record. If you are unsure, contact the repository team and we can check for you.

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Tips for finding a suitable journal

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  • Talk to peers about where they publish.
  • Think about the reach of the journal and who is your target audience.
  • Look where others in your field are publishing using SCOPUS document search and Analyse results feature. For known authors, you can use the author search.
  • Check out the SOURCES feature in SCOPUS to identify potential journals. A handy tutorial is available to help compare journals.
  • Beware of predatory journals contacting you to publish with them. Check on DOAJ – the Directory of Open Access Journals – to see if it is registered.
  • Once you have found your target journal, check the requirements on the author’s guidance pages.
  • The journal may allow open access publishing by either the green or gold routes. If you decide to publish your work via the gold route you will need funds to pay an APC. The target journal may contain a mix of open and subscription only access publishing (this type of journal is a hybrid journal).
  • If you are in receipt of a grant from one of the UK Research Councils, you can access the RCUK block grant.
  • If you are member of the Faculty of Environment and Technology, you can apply to access the Pilot fund for open access publishing costs.
  • Springer offer UWE authors the option to publish open access free of charge in their open choice titles as part of our subscription package
  • If you have chosen to publish in an Open access only journal, check if they require payment of an Article Processing Charge. You may need to choose a different target journal if you don’t have the funds to pay any required APC to the publisher.

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Q: What version should I upload?

Quickfire questions header

Q: What version of the full text should I upload to the Research Repository?

A: The version we are most frequently permitted to archive is the author’s accepted manuscript (also called AAM, accepted version, or post-print).

Dateofacceptance

This is the version of the text that is accepted by the publisher. For journal articles this is after the article has gone through peer review, and any changes resulting from peer review have been incorporated, but before any publisher formatting is added. This means we cannot use proofs, as they feature publisher formatting (of which the publisher holds the copyright.)

This is the version required to comply with the HEFCE policy, and is the version that most journals allow us to archive anyway. For book chapters this is also the version we are most likely to be able to archive, so if in doubt – upload the accepted version. The repository team will check the publisher requirements and get in touch if a different version is required.

Behind the scenes at the Research Repository

Behind the scenes teaser

If you have ever wondered what happens after you click ‘Deposit item now’ and log out of the Research Repository…

If you have ever thought about what happens to your item before it appears on the Research Repository and your staff profile…

If you have pondered about the difference between checking archiving and copyright conditions for a journal article versus a conference item (or just how long it can take)…

Then you will be interested in our latest poster, showing all the steps that your item has to go through between ‘Deposit Item Now’ and you seeing it on the Research Repository. You can see a teaser of the the full poster created by Lisa, the Repository Administrator, above, and the full poster can be viewed online here.

Q: Why can’t I edit my record on the repository?

Quickfire questions header

This is a new series of posts in which we answer some of the frequent questions we receive in the team, which have relatively short, simple answers.

Q: I want to make a change to an item on the Research Repository, but I can’t find an edit function?

A: Once you deposit an item to the Research or Data Repositories you cannot edit the record anymore – it can only be changed by a repository administrator. This is highlighted on the deposit page, the last step in the deposit process. If you know you still want to make changes to a record then do not deposit it at this point! In your repository work area (accessed through the ‘Manage deposits’ link at the top of the page when you log in) you can see the status of any items that you have uploaded.

If the item status is ‘User Workarea‘ then you can still edit this item. Open the record or click the pencil and paper icon next to it to make any changes.

Status

If the item status is ‘Under Review‘ ‘Live Archive‘ or ‘Retired‘ then you cannot edit the item. If there are any changes you wish to make you will need to contact the repository team with the details of the record and the edits that need to be made. The repository team can then update the record for you.

Meet the team: Research and Open Access Librarian

The blog has been up and running for around eight months now and it’s about time we finally introduced the team behind it. Each person in the Library Research Support team will be writing an introduction in our ‘Meet the team’ series of blog posts. Today we feature…

 

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11 Anna with sangria Mexican restaurant Sonora

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are Anna Lawson and Jane Belger, and work as a job-share as the Research and Open Access Librarian with the Research Support Team at UWE Library.

Our role is to provide library-related support to researchers and postgraduate students with their research. This includes, amongst other things:

Anna also works once a month, on the first Thursday of the month, at Glenside Library – so do come and say hello! She runs a drop-in session between 10am and 1pm; do ask at the library help desk if you can’t find her.

Outside of work, we both enjoy travelling and a decent glass of wine, are married to statisticians, and have 5 children between us (ranging in ages from 10 months to 26). But we’re really not the same person!

If you’d like to learn more about open access or research support in the library more generally, do get in touch by e-mailing lib.rke@uwe.ac.uk. Jane will respond Monday to Wednesday, Anna will respond Wednesday through Friday.

Librarians on tour – Australian edition

On tour

Jane, one of the research librarians, spent some time in Australia this Christmas. She couldn’t resist visiting a couple of libraries!

The first one she visited was a little honesty library in a shopping mall in Melbourne. People can borrow the books and bring them back, or replace them with another book, and there is no formal checking out process.

The second library was slightly larger and grander – the state library of Victoria, complete with dedicated chess playing area!

You can see some pictures from Jane’s trip below – click to view them in full.