Meet the team: Library Research Manager

The blog has been up and running for around a year now and it’s about time we finally introduced the team behind it. Each person in the Library Research Support team will be writing an introduction in our ‘Meet the team’ series of blog posts. Today we feature…

JenniHi, I’m Jenni Crossley, the library’s Research Manager. I’ve worked in a variety of roles in the Library Service at UWE Bristol since 2000 (some of you might remember me job sharing as Law Faculty Librarian for a good number of years), and now I have the privilege of supporting the research community here.

My role involves some of the less tangible aspects of research support, such as working to develop our team’s strategy, and ensuring that it fits as far as possible with the UWE Bristol, and wider, research context, or representing research interests within the library’s planning. Overall, I try to keep things moving forward so that our support fits with researchers’ needs. I do some of the more practical work as well though – report writing, attending faculty committee meetings, providing training and so on.

An area of particular interest to me is the growth of open research (publishing and open data), and how this will change scholarly communication. I don’t think we can stick our heads in the sand about this; open research is here to stay and we need to be more willing to acknowledge that and plan accordingly. Please do come and talk to me about this if it interests you, too.

Outside of work I don’t seem to have an awful lot of time for my own pursuits right now, unless you count continuous use of a washing machine as an interest! However, I do manage to fit in a bit of exercise (kettlebells is a current favourite), and I do love music, especially if it’s loud and played on guitars. Sadly, I have never learned to play guitar myself – for some reason I chose the violin instead –  but I am capitalising on my middle child’s keyboard lessons to teach myself to play piano, which is something I’ve wanted to do for a long time. I’m never going to be a pianist, but it keeps the brain occupied!

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Q: Are you sure you’re allowed to do this?

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Q: I’ve been asked for the full text of my paper and I don’t know if I want to send it. Are you actually allowed to put the full text on the Research Repository? Doesn’t that go against the publisher’s terms?

A: The repository team checks the archiving requirements of every item before it is made publicly visible on the Research Repository. We have a few different tools for this depending on the item type.

For journals we use the Sherpa-Romeo database which contains the publisher archiving policies of many journals. This shows what version we are allowed to archive, what embargo we need to apply, and if a set statement is required. We check all of these against what you have uploaded and will get back in contact if we have any queries, otherwise we apply the embargo and statement as required by the publisher.

For book chapters we have a document, which librarians from many institutions have contributed to, which contains details and links to publisher policies. We also check that the version you have provided is the one we are allowed to archive.

If the policy is unclear, or the journal is not in the Sherpa-Romeo database, we look for the policy on the publisher’s website. We will also email the publisher if there is no policy or if we require further information.

SAGE Research Methods – a new resource to support research

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SAGE Research Methods is a database containing over 1,500 resources, dedicated to the subject area of Research Methods. It supports all stages of the research process from: writing a research question, conducting a literature review, choosing the best research methods, analysing data, to writing up your results and thinking about publication.

This can be a really useful resource for both teaching purposes and for your own personal research.

It can be accessed via the library website and provides a whole range of peer reviewed material including handbooks, project plans and videos.

Why not take a look? The library research team are happy to answer any questions you might have about the resources available.


Image from Pexels

Q: Why are there four of me?!

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Q: There are four records for my name on the Research Repository. Can I combine these?

A: When browsing the Research Repository by author (i.e. using the specific ‘Browse‘ feature in the left-hand sidebar as opposed to searching) you may find your name listed multiple times, with different numbers of publications listed.

This happens because the Research Repository records every different instance of a name as a different person (including different punctuation) – so even though Jane Shepard, J. Shepard, J Shepard and Jane C. Shepard are all the same person, the repository gives them all an individual listing.

If you let the repository team know, we can combine the records under one name. This requires opening each record individually and changing the names in the ‘Creators’ field so that they all match.

To prevent this from happening in the first place, please ensure you always enter your name in one consistent format.

Scopus’s 1st birthday at UWE!

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Scopus is an abstract and citation database of peer-review literature, including books, conference proceedings and journals, covering the following fields of research: science, technology, medicine, social sciences, and arts and humanities. We have been subscribing to it for a year on 1st April and it seems that increasing numbers of you are accessing it! We’ve just had our latest statistics through and record views went from 538 last April to 15,673 in January 2018.

If you’ve not had a chance to use Scopus yet, why not give it a go.

You can use it to:

  • Find peer reviewed literature on a range of subjects
  • Look at the abstract and references for each article
  • Export search results to Ref Works or your chosen reference management system
  • View who is citing and talking about articles on social media
  • View the performance data/ metrics on the journals listed
  • Look at what UWE Bristol researchers are publishing
  • Sign up for alerts to follow particular authors or searches.

If you would like more information on this resource, please contact the library research team


Image from Gratisography

Q: I uploaded my paper so why is there no record for it?

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Q: I deposited my paper on the Research Repository but it isn’t showing up – what’s going on?

A: The most likely explanation is that the deposit process was not completed. The final step in depositing the paper is hitting the ‘Deposit Item Now’ button on the Deposit screen:

Deposit

Just clicking through to the Deposit screen is not enough – you must click this button.

You can tell when an item has been successfully deposited because the item status will change from ‘User Workarea‘ to ‘Under Review‘. Later, once it has been checked by a repository administrator, it will be moved to the live repository and the status will change to ‘Live Archive‘.

Librarians on Tour – New York Public Library

On tour

A couple of months ago, Lisa went on holiday to New York and she couldn’t resist a visit to New York Public Library (the third largest public library in the world!). There had been a dusting of snow that day, so it looked really pretty from the outside!

NY Public Library External      NY Public Library External3

It is also an incredible building inside, with large public reading rooms and grand hallways filled with amazing artwork.

NY Public Library Internal    NY Public Library Internal2

Downstairs there is a children’s library with a Winnie the Pooh exhibit, containing Christopher Robin’s original teddies!

NY Public Library FS     NY Public Library WP

It’s free to have a look around, so I definitely recommend a visit next time you’re in the Big Apple!