Open Access Week: Open research – what’s in it for you?

The benefits of open access for the public good are well documented. The increasingly educated public should be able to access the research that they have paid for through taxation and various funders, such as RCUK mandate this.

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Why open access by Danny Kingsley and Sarah Brown, under a CC-BY license

However, is there any real advantage for researchers?  Laurent Gatto (2017) gives his view, as an early career researcher, on why research should be open wherever possible. He argues that open scholarship is “not only the right thing to do, but is also the best thing to do”. He explains that open access articles really do get more citations and making your data open facilitates reproducible research, which enables the continuity of your work and build reputation.

Check out the full blog post, and links to other useful articles, at:

Gatto, L. (2017) An early career researcher’s view on modern and open scholarship. Laurent Gatto [blog]. September. Available from: https://lgatto.github.io/EPFL-open-science/ [Accessed 17 October 2017].

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Open Access Week: Faculty number 1s

As part of Open Access Week we took a look at the most downloaded items of all time (aka March 2010 when the Research Repository was established to October 2017) for the four faculties at UWE Bristol – Arts, Creative Industries and Education (ACE). Business and Law (FBL), Environment and Technology (FET), and Health and Applied Sciences (HAS). All figures are correct as of 23 October 2017.

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ACE –  The sociology of education is a book section. It is otherwise only available to read by purchasing the book, or by borrowing from a library with a copy. It is the second most downloaded item on the Research Repository, and has been accessed by readers from the UK, USA, Germany, Zambia, and India (among others.)

FBL – The ‘work group’: Redressing the balance in Bion’s Experiences in Groups is a journal article published in the journal Human Relations. The article is otherwise only available to read if the reader’s institution is subscribed to the journal.

FET – A health map for the local human habitat is a journal article published in The Journal for the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, and has been referenced in two policy documents.

HAS – Using thematic analysis in psychology is without question the ‘big daddy’ of the Research Repository, having been downloaded almost twice as many times as the other nineteen items in the all time top twenty combined.* It also has 14,700 citations in Scopus and is in the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric.

By being made available through green open access on the Research Repository, all of these researchers have allowed people from across the globe to access and use their research without the need for an institutional affiliation or prohibitively expensive subscriptions.


*The other nineteen items in the top twenty have been downloaded 271,538 times combined as of 23 October 2017.

Open Access Week: Benefits poster

What are the benefits of open access?

When it comes to deciding where to publish your research outputs, one of the questions you will need to ask yourself is “Do I want to publish my research in an open access journal, or in a traditional subscription journal?” Although you might have to pay a greater initial up-front cost, publishing your article in an open access journal has many benefits. These benefits are highlighted in the poster below – click on the poster to view it at a larger size!

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Open Access Week begins on Monday

Autumn is truly here – the days are getting shorter, the air is getting crisper, leaves are falling from the trees and we’re all thinking about certain round, orange items that have their heyday in October…

Nope, not pumpkins – the open access logo!

Happy OA Week

23-29 October is Open Access Week and to celebrate we’ll have a blog post going up each day Monday-Friday next week. We’ll also be tweeting from the Library so be sure to follow @UWELibrary on Twitter.

Check back on Monday for our first post.

 

Blog tools

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There are a few different resources we use when finding and producing content for the blog, and this post looks at the three that we make the most use of.

1. CC Search and CC Search Beta

We like using images on this blog. We also like making sure we comply with copyright law, which isn’t always easy when you want to use images found on the internet (just because it does not have a copyright notice on it, that does not mean copyright does not exist.)

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Publishers take ResearchGate to court

In September 2017, ResearchGate was issued with a request to alter its article sharing system, asking for the implementation of an automated system which would address copyright concerns (we have previously discussed the potential copyright infringement on ResearchGate on this blog.)

After ResearchGate rejected the proposed system, the publishers – ACS, Elsevier, Brill, Wiley and Wolters Kluwer (called the “Coalition for Responsible Sharing”) began issuing mass take-down notices in order to get copyright infringing articles removed from the site. As the coalition does not see this as a permanent solution, two of the coalition – Elsevier and the American Chemical Society (ACS) – have taken ResearchGate to court in Germany.

As always, we would encourage authors to upload their work to the Research Repository first, and to check the copyright status and publisher archiving policy before uploading their work anywhere else.


Sources: