SAGE Research Methods – a new resource to support research

Cropped man and woman using electronic device free image

SAGE Research Methods is a database containing over 1,500 resources, dedicated to the subject area of Research Methods. It supports all stages of the research process from: writing a research question, conducting a literature review, choosing the best research methods, analysing data, to writing up your results and thinking about publication.

This can be a really useful resource for both teaching purposes and for your own personal research.

It can be accessed via the library website and provides a whole range of peer reviewed material including handbooks, project plans and videos.

Why not take a look? The library research team are happy to answer any questions you might have about the resources available.


Image from Pexels

Advertisements

Scopus’s 1st birthday at UWE!

368H

Scopus is an abstract and citation database of peer-review literature, including books, conference proceedings and journals, covering the following fields of research: science, technology, medicine, social sciences, and arts and humanities. We have been subscribing to it for a year on 1st April and it seems that increasing numbers of you are accessing it! We’ve just had our latest statistics through and record views went from 538 last April to 15,673 in January 2018.

If you’ve not had a chance to use Scopus yet, why not give it a go.

You can use it to:

  • Find peer reviewed literature on a range of subjects
  • Look at the abstract and references for each article
  • Export search results to Ref Works or your chosen reference management system
  • View who is citing and talking about articles on social media
  • View the performance data/ metrics on the journals listed
  • Look at what UWE Bristol researchers are publishing
  • Sign up for alerts to follow particular authors or searches.

If you would like more information on this resource, please contact the library research team


Image from Gratisography

Librarians on Tour – New York Public Library

On tour

A couple of months ago, Lisa went on holiday to New York and she couldn’t resist a visit to New York Public Library (the third largest public library in the world!). There had been a dusting of snow that day, so it looked really pretty from the outside!

NY Public Library External      NY Public Library External3

It is also an incredible building inside, with large public reading rooms and grand hallways filled with amazing artwork.

NY Public Library Internal    NY Public Library Internal2

Downstairs there is a children’s library with a Winnie the Pooh exhibit, containing Christopher Robin’s original teddies!

NY Public Library FS     NY Public Library WP

It’s free to have a look around, so I definitely recommend a visit next time you’re in the Big Apple!

Librarians on tour – the Library at the Lake

On tour

Back in 2016, Charley was in Slovenia, not looking for libraries at all. You don’t normally expect to find libraries in a place like this:

DSCN3812

Sure it looks beautiful but it was FREEZING when you tried to paddle in it

But even a lake can be a suitable place for a library – in this case a little free library in a lovingly crafted little house.

The library offered books for anyone to borrow and read while sitting in the sun around the lake. Books could then be returned, or you could add a book of your own to the collection.


All the photos in this post were created by Charley Vaughton and are licensed under a CC-BY 4.0 license

Tips for finding a suitable journal

concept-1868728_640

  • Talk to peers about where they publish.
  • Think about the reach of the journal and who is your target audience.
  • Look where others in your field are publishing using SCOPUS document search and Analyse results feature. For known authors, you can use the author search.
  • Check out the SOURCES feature in SCOPUS to identify potential journals. A handy tutorial is available to help compare journals.
  • Beware of predatory journals contacting you to publish with them. Check on DOAJ – the Directory of Open Access Journals – to see if it is registered.
  • Once you have found your target journal, check the requirements on the author’s guidance pages.
  • The journal may allow open access publishing by either the green or gold routes. If you decide to publish your work via the gold route you will need funds to pay an APC. The target journal may contain a mix of open and subscription only access publishing (this type of journal is a hybrid journal).
  • If you are in receipt of a grant from one of the UK Research Councils, you can access the RCUK block grant.
  • If you are member of the Faculty of Environment and Technology, you can apply to access the Pilot fund for open access publishing costs.
  • Springer offer UWE authors the option to publish open access free of charge in their open choice titles as part of our subscription package
  • If you have chosen to publish in an Open access only journal, check if they require payment of an Article Processing Charge. You may need to choose a different target journal if you don’t have the funds to pay any required APC to the publisher.

Image from pixabay.com

Behind the scenes at the Research Repository

Behind the scenes teaser

If you have ever wondered what happens after you click ‘Deposit item now’ and log out of the Research Repository…

If you have ever thought about what happens to your item before it appears on the Research Repository and your staff profile…

If you have pondered about the difference between checking archiving and copyright conditions for a journal article versus a conference item (or just how long it can take)…

Then you will be interested in our latest poster, showing all the steps that your item has to go through between ‘Deposit Item Now’ and you seeing it on the Research Repository. You can see a teaser of the the full poster created by Lisa, the Repository Administrator, above, and the full poster can be viewed online here.

Librarians on tour – Australian edition

On tour

Jane, one of the research librarians, spent some time in Australia this Christmas. She couldn’t resist visiting a couple of libraries!

The first one she visited was a little honesty library in a shopping mall in Melbourne. People can borrow the books and bring them back, or replace them with another book, and there is no formal checking out process.

The second library was slightly larger and grander – the state library of Victoria, complete with dedicated chess playing area!

You can see some pictures from Jane’s trip below – click to view them in full.