Open Access Week: Wrap-up

This is our final post for Open Access Week 2017, and we’re using it as a bit of a wrap-up to go over our activities this week.

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Unfortunately we did not get cake. We will have to address this next year!

On Monday we published our new Open Access Benefits poster, which highlights all the benefits that publishing your work open access brings to the author, journal, and readers.

On Tuesday we recounted the story of one UWE Bristol academic who generated huge buzz around her project and reached social work practitioners by publishing her article open access.

On Wednesday we showed you what the most downloaded works from the Research Repository were for each faculty – all of which could not be accessed by so many readers if they were only hidden behind paywalls.

And yesterday we showed you a really interesting opinion piece from an Early Career Researcher about why they believed that open research was so important.

We’ve also been busy on Twitter, using #OAWeek (or #OAWeek17 or #OAWeek2017 on Monday) and #openaccess to talk about open access topics.

We’ll leave you with a comment from Professor Martin Eve, which originally concluded the first event in our Open Research Series.

You don’t know your audience sometimes. I really get quite cross when people tell me “there’s no audience for my work” or “everyone who needs to know about this gets to know about it because I’ve published it in this top journal.” I get letters, emails from people, saying “I’ve just read your article on Theoretical Aspects of David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas and it was really interesting to me, I just had a university education.” Out of the blue someone wrote to me “I don’t have access to these other journals but I read this because it was openly available, I thought it was really great. I’ve had a lot to drink, its 2 AM, thanks a lot.” [Laughter] I mean, there’s a humorous side to it that makes me smile whenever I get them, but on the other hand…especially in my field I’m writing about human culture and literatures – what’s the point of doing that if the people who read literature can’t read it? We’re just talking to ourselves the whole time.

Happy Open Access Week everyone – now let’s start thinking about #OAWeek2018!


Image: “Open Access Week 2013” by SLUB Dresden is licensed under CC BY 2.0

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