I’m ready for my close-up…

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I (Charley) recently had the luck to be involved in the photoshoot for our new Research Support Team banner. Our old banner is out of date, so we need a new one to take for our regular visits to other campuses, as well as to other events or out ‘on tour’ around Frenchay campus.

I thought that I would be helping guide the photographer about what the models in the photo needed to do, and what we needed the photo to portray. Instead I found myself as one of the models! My fellow model and I gestured at a laptop, waved pens around, and made interested looking faces while trying to think of things to chat about. It was all a bit odd – I don’t know how the professionals do it.

All this means that we will soon be able to unveil our new banner, and you will then be able to spot me sitting under a picture of my own face, ready to answer any queries about open access or the repositories. Stay tuned for more information!


 

Photo found via Pexels

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Q: What counts for the REF policy?

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Q: I know that the policy for REF 2021 requires the accepted manuscript of an item to be uploaded to the Research Repository within three months of the date of acceptance but does this apply to everything that I want to submit?

A: The policy only applies to journal articles and conference papers published in proceedings with an ISSN. These items need to be uploaded to the Research Repository before the deadline.

Other items, such as book chapters, creative works, or monographs, do not need to comply with the policy in order to be eligible for the REF. We still encourage UWE Bristol researchers to add these to the Research Repository and to upload the full text whenever possible. You will need to create a record on the Research Repository in order to add the item to your REF CV in any case.

Journal articles and conference papers which were accepted for publication prior to 01 April 2016 do not need to comply with the policy – this is when the policy came into effect.

Options for open access publishing

Confused about how to make your work available open access? We have created a new guide showing the different routes available to UWE Bristol researchers, and it is available as an easy-to-follow poster (click on the poster to see it larger):

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The poster outlines the routes to open access via the gold and green routes.

  • The gold route to open access is achieved through paying an article processing charge or publishing in a journal where we have an offset agreement – this means your work will be immediately publicly visible.
  • The green route to open access is achieved by freely uploading your work to the UWE Research Repository, where it can (usually) become publicly visible after an embargo period.

Both are routes to open access, and all items should be added to the Research Repository regardless of whether they are already published via gold open access.

For more information, read the poster, contact us, and check out the Library webpages.

Meet the team: Library Research Manager

The blog has been up and running for around a year now and it’s about time we finally introduced the team behind it. Each person in the Library Research Support team will be writing an introduction in our ‘Meet the team’ series of blog posts. Today we feature…

JenniHi, I’m Jenni Crossley, the library’s Research Manager. I’ve worked in a variety of roles in the Library Service at UWE Bristol since 2000 (some of you might remember me job sharing as Law Faculty Librarian for a good number of years), and now I have the privilege of supporting the research community here.

My role involves some of the less tangible aspects of research support, such as working to develop our team’s strategy, and ensuring that it fits as far as possible with the UWE Bristol, and wider, research context, or representing research interests within the library’s planning. Overall, I try to keep things moving forward so that our support fits with researchers’ needs. I do some of the more practical work as well though – report writing, attending faculty committee meetings, providing training and so on.

An area of particular interest to me is the growth of open research (publishing and open data), and how this will change scholarly communication. I don’t think we can stick our heads in the sand about this; open research is here to stay and we need to be more willing to acknowledge that and plan accordingly. Please do come and talk to me about this if it interests you, too.

Outside of work I don’t seem to have an awful lot of time for my own pursuits right now, unless you count continuous use of a washing machine as an interest! However, I do manage to fit in a bit of exercise (kettlebells is a current favourite), and I do love music, especially if it’s loud and played on guitars. Sadly, I have never learned to play guitar myself – for some reason I chose the violin instead –  but I am capitalising on my middle child’s keyboard lessons to teach myself to play piano, which is something I’ve wanted to do for a long time. I’m never going to be a pianist, but it keeps the brain occupied!

Q: Are you sure you’re allowed to do this?

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Q: I’ve been asked for the full text of my paper and I don’t know if I want to send it. Are you actually allowed to put the full text on the Research Repository? Doesn’t that go against the publisher’s terms?

A: The repository team checks the archiving requirements of every item before it is made publicly visible on the Research Repository. We have a few different tools for this depending on the item type.

For journals we use the Sherpa-Romeo database which contains the publisher archiving policies of many journals. This shows what version we are allowed to archive, what embargo we need to apply, and if a set statement is required. We check all of these against what you have uploaded and will get back in contact if we have any queries, otherwise we apply the embargo and statement as required by the publisher.

For book chapters we have a document, which librarians from many institutions have contributed to, which contains details and links to publisher policies. We also check that the version you have provided is the one we are allowed to archive.

If the policy is unclear, or the journal is not in the Sherpa-Romeo database, we look for the policy on the publisher’s website. We will also email the publisher if there is no policy or if we require further information.

SAGE Research Methods – a new resource to support research

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SAGE Research Methods is a database containing over 1,500 resources, dedicated to the subject area of Research Methods. It supports all stages of the research process from: writing a research question, conducting a literature review, choosing the best research methods, analysing data, to writing up your results and thinking about publication.

This can be a really useful resource for both teaching purposes and for your own personal research.

It can be accessed via the library website and provides a whole range of peer reviewed material including handbooks, project plans and videos.

Why not take a look? The library research team are happy to answer any questions you might have about the resources available.


Image from Pexels

Q: Why are there four of me?!

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Q: There are four records for my name on the Research Repository. Can I combine these?

A: When browsing the Research Repository by author (i.e. using the specific ‘Browse‘ feature in the left-hand sidebar as opposed to searching) you may find your name listed multiple times, with different numbers of publications listed.

This happens because the Research Repository records every different instance of a name as a different person (including different punctuation) – so even though Jane Shepard, J. Shepard, J Shepard and Jane C. Shepard are all the same person, the repository gives them all an individual listing.

If you let the repository team know, we can combine the records under one name. This requires opening each record individually and changing the names in the ‘Creators’ field so that they all match.

To prevent this from happening in the first place, please ensure you always enter your name in one consistent format.