Our poster!

We don’t get to mess around with crafts enough in the Research team, so when the All Staff Event for library staff required teams to make posters we jumped in with scissors, glue, and lots of black pens. We played around with photoshopping, drew tiny pigeons, and measured very (VERY) precisely in order to create our research ‘advent calendar’ which you can now see in all its glory:

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Hopefully we’ll get the chance to do more creative things like this to share research support more often!

Spotlight: SAM App

Today’s spotlight is SAM, the Self-help Anxiety Management app created at UWE Bristol. The app was developed as a tool to help students (and anyone around the world who suffers with anxiety) to manage and better support their anxiety. The app features different tools and activities to help users monitor their anxiety levels and reduce anxiety during an attack.

The Research Repository includes a project report and links to a video summarising the project. There is also a further project report available, which goes into further detail.

The app is available for free for Android and Apple devices, and was declared one of Healthline’s Best Anxiety App winners for 2016.

Using copyright material in your thesis

As a postgraduate researcher writing your thesis you may need or want to use third-party material for which you do not own the copyright. This can become a problem when you upload your thesis to the Research Repository – without permission to use the material, we will not be able to make your thesis visible and it can result in your award being delayed.

The Library Research Support team have written a guide to using copyright material in your thesis, covering different types of copyright material, what you need to do to get permission, what the alternatives are, and what your options are if permission is denied. View and download it on the Research Repository help pages.

And don’t forget – you can always contact us with questions.


Image: “Copyright help 5¢… the scholar is [IN]. #ala2013” by sylvar is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Rewind: Open Access Week 2016 – Altmetrics in detail

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Today’s rewind is an infographic from Open Access Week 2016, showing what else you can discover from altmetrics besides the donut score – including more detailed information about what people are saying about your work. To see the full infographic, click on the preview above.

For information about altmetrics and what they mean for your research please feel free to contact us.

Spotlight: La Voisin

The spotlight today is an artist’s book, La Voisin by Sarah Bodman.

“But that doesn’t look like a book!” I hear you exclaim. Artist’s books come in all shapes and sizes. Some closely resemble traditional books, others are more abstract or even electronic. All are pieces of art usually produced in small print runs or as one-of-a-kind pieces.

La Voisin is “[t]he imaginary diary of Catherine Monvoisin; provider of potions, solutions and services to the court of Louis XIV.” It was produced in a limited edition of only three pieces, presented in a box including a bottle, a dried red rose, prints, and diary entries. The Research Repository record includes a photo of the book as well as further information about the exhibition it was presented at.

UWE Bristol holds several artist’s books in its library collection at Bower Ashton campus, including those produced by UWE Bristol researchers. More information about artist’s book can be found at the Book Arts website.

 

Rewind: Open Access Week 2016 – Mmmm, donuts

Donut - A4, OriginalToday’s rewind is the third poster originally created for Open Access Week 2016. Altmetrics donuts now appear on journal article on the UWE Bristol Research Repository, and this poster explains what they are and what they mean. Click on the poster to see it at full size.

The donut shows the attention that an article has received from ‘alternative’ sources including news outlets, blogs, policy documents, and Twitter. It can be used in conjunction with ‘traditional’ metrics (like citation rates) to give an idea of research impact.