Open research series

In case you missed the open research series organised by the Research Support team in January, you can catch the recordings from the events at the links below:

  1. Open access: It’s real and it’s happening now
  2. Open access: It’s legal and it’s good to be involved!
  3. The path to data sharing: How open can I go?

Each session focused on different area of open access and was delivered by a variety of speakers.

Open access: It’s real and it’s happening now includes a talk from Professor Martin Eve, co-founder and CEO of the Open Library of Humanities, who speaks about where open access is coming from and where it can be going. This is followed by a discussion about researcher experiences of open access, featuring research staff from UWE Bristol.

Open access: It’s legal and it’s good to be involved! was delivered by several members of the library team. We give an overview of open access, a behind the scenes look at the Research Repository, an overview of creative commons licenses, and more information about the green and gold routes of publishing, the dangers of ResearchGate, funder requirements, and ORCiD.

The path to data sharing: How open can I go? features a talk from Professor Felix Ritchie about open data and the 5 safes framework. The session also covers research governance, data management plans, and the support available for data management at UWE Bristol.


Image used – “Open Sign” by Chip Griffin is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Spotlight: Bright bricks, dark play

Lego chapter

To head off any questions in advance – no, the subject of today’s spotlight is not a LEGO model (no. 5978, Sphinx Secret Surprise in case you were interested, released in 1998.)

Bright bricks, dark play: On the impossibility of studying LEGO is a book chapter by Seth Giddings, looking at how LEGO is played with and asking ‘if LEGO play does not follow the instructions, how can it be studied?’ Seth asked for memories of playing with LEGO in childhood and these memories are discussed in the chapter.

If you find this interesting, Seth has uploaded another book chapter, this time about the video game LEGO Star Wars, and the success (or not!) of playing it.

Sconul article

The Research team received top billing for their recent article in the latest issue of SCONUL Focus.

The article is about research support at UWE Bristol and gives an overview of how the team has developed over the years, and what has developed and changed in what we do to support researchers and postgraduate students.

The article is available for anyone to read on the Research Repository. Take a look and let us know what you think!


Image: “Reading…” by herval is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Tour de UWE

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We had a glorious day for the Tour de UWE 2017 – the event is an annual opportunity for library staff to take part in either a cycle ride or a walk, and aims to raise money for the charity Life Cycle.

The Research team went off on the walk, which took us through Stoke Park on the sculpture trail. The whole troupe of librarians on the walk managed to find the hedgehogs, snake, and (eventually) the owls – after enlisting the aid of some helpful children who were very keen to show us where they were! (Librarians know the value of asking an expert to help you find the things you need.)

As half the walkers went off to Boston Tea Party for lunch, the hardy picnickers carried on and found the rabbit and mouse sculptures. Unfortunately the fox remains hidden in the woods, undiscovered on this walk (maybe next year?)

An exercise in outreach – explaining a mouse penis to the TSA

Be honest – how many of you clicked onto this post just because of the title? (There’s a whole post in that just in itself – how articles with ‘popular’ or eyecatching headlines get more impressions from social media and therefore higher altmetric scores…but that’s a topic for another day.)

This article from The Atlantic, That Time the TSA Found a Scientist’s 3-D-Printed Mouse Penis is an entertaining read just to see the sheer variety of weird and wonderful things that scientists carry on to planes in the name of research. Ancient bones? Check. Bat detecting equipment? Check. Live frogs? Check. But it also raises an interesting point around scientific outreach.

Continue Reading

Rewind: Open Access Week 2016 – Glossary (or, What are all these abbreviations?)

Glossary - OriginalToday’s rewind is the final poster originally created for Open Access Week 2016, but don’t let that make you think it isn’t still relevant. This poster is a glossary of some of the abbreviations and jargon used by the Library Research team every day. What does APC stand for? What is the definition of a ‘research output’? Click on the poster to view it at full size and with links to further information.

There is also a little ‘decipher the code’ quiz in the bottom right corner of the poster to test yourself once you have read it.

Scopus – the citation and abstract database for UWE

Web of Science is being replaced by Scopus – the largest abstract database of peer-reviewed literature: scientific journals, books and conference proceedings pertaining to science, technology, medicine, social sciences, and arts and humanities.

Scopus screenshot

Reproduced with permission from Michaela Kurschildgen, Elsevier

With a user-friendly interface, Scopus features smart tools to track, analyse and visualise research.

Log in via the UWE LIBRARY A-Z index and register on the Scopus webpage to enable personalisation and extra features including:

  • Save search
  • Save to list
  • Export to preferred reference management software
  • Set up alerts to keep track of new publications in your search criteria or follow authors.

With citation information, this database helps users to build on their literature search.

Authors- don’t forget to link your Scopus author profile to your ORCID to increase the visibility of your research and ensure reliable attribution of your work.

If you have any questions about using Scopus, contact the research team for more information.