Publisher offset deals for gold open access

buy-cash-coins-9660

The gold route to open access requires authors to pay an article processing charge (APC) to a publisher upon acceptance of their article, allowing the publisher to make the article freely available for anyone to read under a creative commons license.

The library manages a series of offset deals with certain publishers which allow UWE Bristol researchers to publish their work through the gold route to open access with reduced (or free!) APCs.

  • Taylor and Francis have a voucher scheme, entitling UWE Bristol authors to a limited number of discounted APCs.
  • Springer allows UWE Bristol authors to have their articles made open access in their hybrid journals, without payment of an additional publication fee.  A full list of eligible journals can be found on the Springer Open Choice webpage.
  • Sage offers UWE Bristol authors a discounted APC of £200 (from SAGE Choice Scheme) in their hybrid journals.
  • Open Library of the Humanities (OLH) offers UWE Bristol authors free open access publishing in their hosted journals. OLH is funded through a model of library partnership subsidies of which UWE Bristol is a member.

If you are planning to publish with any of these publishers (or you are considering where to publish your next article) you can find more information about applying for these deals on the library website.


Image found via Pexels

Advertisements

Librarians on Tour – Exeter Central Library

On tour

In mid-May, I (Anna) was lucky enough to re-visit my hometown and child-hood library, Exeter Central Library. This time though, I wasn’t running up the circle-slope outside the library, hunting through the children’s books, or playing on the rocking horse. Instead, I was attending an Introduction to Grant seeking course run by SWRLS and led by Bill Bruty (a professional fundraiser).

I got to see Exeter Central Library from a very different perspective – enjoying the very open, window-filled conference room; getting a chance to read the displays, and letters home, from Indians who fought in the world wars; enjoying the way that bay ends had recognisable photos of the local area; and taking a quick peek at the FabLab (where members of the public can design their own products, including the use of a 3D printer).

The Research Support team – now animated!

Nominated for no award, but we're pretty happy with itWe are always looking for new ways in which to alert UWE researchers about what the Research Support team can do for them. For this year’s all staff event we were tasked with creating a video to let new starters in Student Success Services know what the Library Research Support team does, and we thought that it would also be useful for researchers as a breakdown of how the team can support them.

We always like to take the opportunity to be a bit creative (as seen in our poster from last year) and wanted to take a fun approach – so we animated ourselves using Powtoon.

The resulting video is two and a half minutes of useful information wrapped in a cartoon package. Hopefully our researchers find it a helpful and memorable introduction to the Library Research Support team.

The video is available to view (with subtitles) on Vimeo. We hope you enjoy!

ACE Creative Skills Week

I (Charley) am going to be taking part in the Creative Skills Week for ACE staff taking place over the next few days.

  • On Friday 22nd June at 10:30 at Bower Ashton campus I will be doing a short presentation session billed as ‘Meet your research support librarian’. this will be a chance to get an overview of the ways in which the Research Support team can support researchers and PGRs, and will feature (fingers crossed for technology working) our new team animated video!
  • On Monday 25th June I will be at Bower Ashton campus again, available for drop-in questions and chats. Come along with any specific questions about how we can help you with your research.

Come along and find out more about the team!

#UWEGold

The results of the 2018 Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) are in and UWE achieved gold status. To celebrate, the university threw a reception for staff featuring cake, drinks, and an ice-cream van. The Research Support team spotted the van out of the office window and the next thing anyone knew we were all enjoying free ice-creams!

You can see some pictures of the event below.

Librarians on Tour – Bristol Zoo AULIC Visit

On tour

On Wednesday 23rd May I (Lisa) was lucky enough to spend the morning at Bristol Zoo to visit the library there, and find out more about what they do. The morning began with an introduction from Simon Garrett (Head of Learning), who talked about the three main areas that they cover: 1) Conservation, 2) Field work, and 3) Changing human behaviours.  As well as providing entertainment for the public, zoos are able to target people of all ages and challenge the decisions that they are making in their everyday lives, which could have a big impact on the environment. This year they are working on a behaviour change campaign that encourages consumers to purchase sustainable palm oil.

We were then split into two groups, and my group was taken on a tour of the Education Centre, which included a lecture room, lab, computer room, common room, and library. Siobhan (the only Bristol Zoo librarian!) delivered an interesting talk about the library, and the resources that they have. Here are some facts about the library:

  • The library can be used by University students, researchers, zoo staff, volunteers, and the public upon request.
  • It is relatively small, with 4500 books, 2500 journal issues, and 2 e-resource subscriptions!
  • A large collection of the books were donated from the BBC Wildlife unit. Other books were obtained from departments around the zoo.
  • There is a unique cataloguing system, which was developed many years ago by volunteers, and has never been changed (e.g. Ec-H-W-5 would indicate a book in the ecology section, under the subheadings habitat – woodland, which was the fifth book to be added to this group).

We were then free to browse the books, and admire the interesting view out the window of the capybaras!

rick        library

Continue Reading

Unpaywall – finding research papers to read for free

Capture

Unpaywall is a free browser extension for Firefox and Chrome, as well as a database of open access articles. When you come up against an article that is behind a paywall, Unpaywall searches its database for a free to read version for you, and produces a button on the right side of your screen, which takes you to the free version.

Unpaywall searches journals and repositories, so it is completely legal. It does not harvest any sources where the legality of uploads could be questionable (e.g. ResearchGate.) True open access aficionados can even turn on ‘OA Nerd Mode’ which colour codes the button to show whether the free version is gold, green, or bronze open access!

Add the browser extension to start locating free articles.